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The Influence of Furniture on Love: Wysing Arts Centre

‘The Influence of Furniture on Love’, along with the exhibition ‘Hey, I’m Mr Poetic’, staged at Wysing Arts Centre between April and June this year, are both pauses to reflect on the institution’s 35-year history. Although Wysing has an exhibitions and events programme coordinated by in-house curators, and on-site studios and specialist workshops, over theread more

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DeWain Valentine: Almine Rech Gallery

DeWain Valentine’s jewel-like cast polyester resin sculptures at Almine Rech, London, are an unexpected compliment to the Barbican’s survey of that prodigious Californian partnership, Charles and Ray Eames. Aside from being long-term adoptive Angelenos – wisened to the ways of smog-enhanced light and space – both artist and architects were, as Rowan Moore wrote ofread more

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Stuart Brisley: Modern Art Oxford

Celebrated as one of Britain’s most compelling post-war performance artists, Stuart Brisley had, by the early 1980s, begun to suspect performance’s limitations, seeking to expand it by incorporating sculpture, photography, film and painting. At the turn of the millennium, Brisley instituted the Museum of Ordure – ordure: shit, trash, dirt, entropy – to build aread more

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Akram Zaatari: SALT Beyoğlu

Only later, reconstructing my visit, did I realize SALT Beyoğlu’s elevator had both deposited me into stratified earth and lifted me amid exploding fireworks. This feeling spanned the three floors of Akram Zaatari’s survey exhibition: a tender tryst of inward- and outward-bearing forces, graveness defused by airy affection, and vice-versa. Zaatari has long used archaeologicalread more

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Bob Cobbing: Exhibition Research Centre

‘Adventure, Aventure, Aventereure, Adventure’ – the iconic opening words of Bob Cobbing’s Sound Poem, 1965, otherwise known as ABC in Sound. Over the duration of 22 minutes, beginning with A and ending with Z, Cobbing recombines letters, words and sounds to effectively rewrite the linguistic institution of the English language. It is a mythic rebeginningread more

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Art Sheffield 2016: Various venues

There’s something curiously out of time about Art Sheffield 2016. While this year’s Glasgow International largely sidesteps political engagement – sidelined for a bohemianism of the senses, Art Sheffield addresses big humanist themes: underlying scientific patterns of life, legacies of de-industrialization, utopianism and freedom. Curated by Martin Clark (co-curator of the 2009 Tate touring exhibitionread more

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Beatrice Loft Schulz: Arcadia Missa

To enter Beatrice Loft Schulz’s “Living Arrangement #” meant passing through a ten-foot-wide, New Agey, patterned curtain of glass beads laboriously threaded by the artist. In advance of the exhibition’s opening, Arcadia Missa director Rosza Farkas told me, Schulz and her assistant, Ruby Read, performed a magic spell to harness the earth’s energy for theread more

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Amanda Beech: BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art

When Sunderland City Council announced last September the imminent closure of its City Library building, the Northern Gallery for Contemporary Art, which had occupied a floor since opening in 1995, received notice of eviction. Venueless, NGCA negotiated with the Baltic to host Amanda Beech’s upcoming exhibition, ‘Covenant Transport Move or Die’, at short notice. Whileread more

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Edward Thomasson: Southard Reid

Unwittingly enacting something central to Edward Thomasson’s exhibition “Other People,” I reflexively supplemented its title to constitute Jean-Paul Sartre’s familiar aphorism “Hell is . . .” Abstracted from its context, the line has become the meme-like slogan of misanthropes. Its separatist ideal, latently theological, envisions withdrawal into the self, the logical consequence of which isread more